Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Come into my kitchen


I am not a good photographer. This shot shows part of the east wall of my kitchen-of-the-seven-doors, above the cluttered kitchen table.

To the left on the shelf, you can see a bit of an old mantle clock...well, its pendulum anyway...behind the milk glass hen. One of those odd items that have stuck around the family for five or six generations.

This is the clock that appears in D&D. The clock that the sudden boingboingboing when it struck scares the livingshit out of Lillie St. Claire when she's searching the house for other paranormal intruders after her dead husband shows up in her bathroom.

I can testify that it sounds sepulchral and definitively doom-laden in the quiet and listening dark.

We all do this, don't we? Integrate not only bits of people we know and thoughts we've had but also incidental personal property into our narratives?

9 comments:

laughingwolf said...

wb b! :D

nice peek into your world, thx...

yeah, i add personal stuff into my tales when i get stuck for touches of 'reality' ;)

Whirlochre said...

Reminds me of Beatrix Potter's cottage, which I visited recently. The whole place is littered with nick-nacks and scenes from the books.

BernardL said...

"We all do this, don't we?"

We sure do. :)

writtenwyrdd said...

I think it's practically impossible not to use stuff from our mantles and the other brickabrack of our lives. (But I don't remember hearing the clock!)

sex scenes at starbucks, said...

I think my Grannie's house will be my protag's house in my next book...

Love seeing your space. :)

Charles Gramlich said...

Gotta love a good sepulchral sounding clock!

raine said...

Integrate not only bits of people we know and thoughts we've had but also incidental personal property into our narratives?

Yes. :)

Steve Malley said...

Joyce Carol Oates says that writing is fundamentally an act of remembering.

I'd say there's also a fair bit of scavenging. I'm practically a magpie, the way I steal shiny bits from my life and others to build my narrative nests...

Bernita said...

Always good to tie fantasy to the real, LW!

Mine's certainly littered, Whirl!

Always makes me feel less of a liar, Bernard.

The clock was added during the final edit, Written, on the suggestion that section needed another sense.

"I think my Grannie's house will be my protag's house in my next book..."
Love that, Betsy!

An antidote to "beepbeepbeep," Charles!

Raine, I like to think that the narrative is the better/stronger for it.

Steve, you're in good company. Margaret Atwood says the same.