Friday, August 24, 2007

Border Land




Glastonbury Tor by twilight.


The Avalon of golden Arthur, some say.


An adjustment to scanner settings and Annwn, portal of the past and future, towers out of the mist and myth, ruled by an older, darker lord, Gwyn ap Nudd.


The haze of everyday living may limit the boundary line of ordinary vision and invest a startling significance and a special importance to such people or things which might rise, unexpectedly, out of the shifting shadows, out of the fog, out of the shrouds of memory.


Writers have an unusual power over the ley lines, the maze walks, over the portal places that lead to the Well of Seeing.


Do you lead them deeper into the dark or does your lantern burn away the mist?


35 comments:

Ric said...

Keep them in the dark, at every turn. And if the mists begin to clear, deep shadows & fearful sound, the dim candle forever receding into the fog.

Draw them in, and when the goal is reached, they turn about saying, "How clever, how delightful, that I didn't see the clues, the landmarks along the way."

Seeley deBorn said...

I keep my light dim. I love the shadows.

Jaye Wells said...

I have no idea. I'm just stumbling around in the mists myself.

Bernita said...

Sorry that Blogger reversed the photos on me.The second one should be first.

Ric, that's a wonderful extension! Thank you!

The space between - where light and dark, land and water, earth and sky meet and merge - fascinates me, Seeley.

Bernita said...

Maybe, Jaye, maybe not... but somehow I doubt you are lost.

writtenwyrdd said...

My intent is to paint the picture, but they must volunteer, like Alice and her looking glass, to step inside and explore it for themselves. If the mist parts, it is an act of providence. ;)

Charles Gramlich said...

Take them into the dark and leave them, is my motto. Which is similar but not exactly what ric was saying. The dark is where we all live and die, so if fiction is to express truth then what other choice is there?

sex scenes at starbucks said...

deeper into the dark, no doubt.

Angie said...

The shadows, definitely. :) Although if a writer can camouflage the shadows so the reader thinks they're walking in light, until they arrive someplace they didn't expect at all, that's fun too. [innocent humming]

Angie

Bernita said...

Written, would you call that the swamp-boggle approach?

So you suggest no moral component or obligation, Charles?

"innocent humming" - that's delightful, Angie!

Bernita said...

Snares and pit-traps too, SS?

The Anti-Wife said...

OOOO! It's dark in here. Think I just stubbed my toe. Must remember to carry flashlight with extra batteries.

Bernita said...

Surprised me too, AW.
Seems follow the light may lead to the abyss...

spyscribbler said...

Oh! So pretty! A picture like that sets off a whole story in my brain! Wow. I actually feel sad that I can't spend all day visiting that place!

To your question, a bit of an embarrassed I don't know.

raine said...

Do you lead them deeper into the dark or does your lantern burn away the mist?

Hopefully, a bit of both.

Bernita said...

I, too, often dwell in the shadow of doubt, Natasha, and wrestle with what lurks there.

Raine, I like that solution!

Gabriele C. said...

Dark German woods, mist covered Scottish highlands - I don't know if I can write the Visigoths in sunlit Italy as well as those veiled landscapes.

I've always liked autumn best, and it's a soft, veiled season. With the occasional storm.

Bernita said...

Mist and shadow are extraordinarily evocative, Gabriele, invitingly soft as a footfall at half-light, when blood is dark, not red.

Scott from Oregon said...

I like dark places when armed with a flashlight.

jason evans said...

This is a really great post.

Ever notice how everything is more beautiful in dim light? Given room to work, our brains fill the obscured places with the ideal, with perfection. I try to give readers that room.

Bernita said...

I suppose it depends on what you are looking for, Scott.

Thank you, Jason.
I agree things look different in the dim.

Jon M said...

Deeper into the dark, deeper, then they can use their imaginations too!

The Anti-Wife said...

"Ever notice how everything is more beautiful in dim light?"
I know my wrinkles don't show as much!

Sam said...

I'm a sun person, even though I can't stay out in the sun, lol.
I like bright lights, golden light, pale light, sunlight, moonlight...
No shadows for me.
Unless it's fiction. Then I like to swirl mist, lurk in the shade, and fumble about in the fog. Or maybe I just better put my glasses back on?
:-)

kmfrontain said...

Dark needs light to have any meaning and the reverse is true as well. If I lead a reader into the dark, it's because the polar opposite becomes that much more intriguing.

Bernita said...

Jpn, I have the feeling you might be an uncomfortable person to have around if the power goes out.

AW, I swear some lights, like fluorescent, make them.

Can;t imagine moonlight without velvet shadows, Sam!

Well put, Karen!

Rob said...

I like to keep them in the dark long enough for their eyes to fully adjust and then light a lantern so bright they have to look away.

Bernita said...

That's very visual, Rob!
~shading my eyes~

Think Karen's observation also reminds us of an important point about light and shadow.

SzélsőFa said...

wow, Rob.

I like when a story is a bit in the shadow, then the writer sheds some lights into the darkest corners - only to find a yet darker pathway....

Bernita said...

A more useful metaphor for invitation and suspense that I realized, Szelsofa!

Ello said...

That's beautiful, and the pictures too!

Shadows are grey, grey is where things that are neither black or white live. It is unclarity, confusion and secrecy. In my real life, I hate shadows and like to live my life in the light or dark, keeping somethings clear and others private. In writing, shades of grey make for a stronger story if used to good effect and not over done.

Great post for introspective thinking!

Shesawriter said...

I try to lead them into the dark, but I usually end up getting everybody lost. ;-)

Tanya

Bernita said...

Thank you, Ello.
Bright demarkations blur the older one becomes.One finds the worls is more gray than one first thought.

I try to lead them out, Tanya, but with the same result!

ScaramoucheX said...

Ah, Glastonbury, the City of Glass,and the site of Gunivere's 'otherwordly captivity'. I thin the illustration os well fitted to your topic, Bernita; very nice.

Bernita said...

Thank you, ScarmoucheX.
I try.