Thursday, May 11, 2006

Built Like A Brick...

Yesterday afternoon, we took the hounds to the rabies clinic at the Firehall to have their shots.
The attendants kept an admiring and respectful distance from Cleo, but fussed over Calvin.
Both beasts were very good, and there erupted no embarassing incidents - inspite of the presence of a number of small protesting creatures they both consider vermin.
One year, I remember, someone came into the cavernous hall with an enormous stripped feline on a leash. Rat-catcher size. The cat surveyed the long line of yipping, whining, leaking, drooling, excited canines with a look that clearly said "Make my day,", turned its back in disdain and sat.
No takers.

The indefatigable Paperback Writer has a beautiful essay up comparing writing a novel to building a house.
And then putting it on the market - agents, lawn signs, supercillious visitors and critics, renovations - the analogy will make you nod your head and laugh.
One immediately wonders what type of architecture would describe one's own novel.
Certainly not a Gothic mansion or a spired fantasy of other-worldly materials, hopefully not a ticky-tacky bungalow just like every other in the development.
I did re-design the front hall though and added some interesting nooks and crannies. Added a spacious third story. Made the master bedroom larger.
Now I wonder if some of the rooms are too small, lack closet space or don't have enough windows, if the stairs are wide enough and did I install enough bathrooms. Hope the footprint fits the property.
We shall see.
The blueprint is adaptable.
What kind/type of house have you (will you) put on the market?

25 comments:

Sela Carsen said...

At this rate, it's more like a lean-to than an actual house.

Dennie McDonald said...

man - I was first before lol

an interesting analogy. I think i'd have a willy-nilly house that has no rhyme or reason to if that would take a free spirit to appreciate. but what do I know, my coffee hasn't kicked in yet...

(pretty close, B? - I have a pretty good memory) =)

Erik Ivan James said...

My novel, when finished, will be a large log cabin. It sits on the shores of a deep cold lake, surrounded by old forests. The cabin's interior is open, save for bathrooms and bedrooms. The view through it's windows expands to forever.

Bernita said...

You have "good" lots of things, Dennie.
So sorry I eliminated you when I deleted the double post.Duh me.

Problem with the analogy about houses is that the outside may look conventional ( thinking Harlequins here) but the inside may be a dream.

Cut out the diffidence, Sela. You do not write wattle and daub.
Or did you mean mine? Well, darn, back to the drawing board.

Bernita said...

Now that sounds like a wonderful, wonderful dwelling, Erik.

Erik Ivan James said...

Umm..Bernita, you make me jealous by using "diffidence" for Sela. Thought that was...er...your pet word for me. :)

jason evans said...

Hopefully, one where every room has a little excitement. A mistake I've been trying to renovate in my novel writing is obligatory scenes. Every scene should have a little spark. If not, pieces of the novel will be boring, and for an unknown writer, I fear that is fatal.

Bernita said...

My pet word for you, Erik, is Dear Guy.
Nevertheless, consider the word for Sela changed to "modest."

That, Jason, is a very, VERY good point.
Those obligatory "hallway" scenes, the hardest to write with any style, should have something distinctive about them.

Sela Carsen said...

Modest? Diffident? Usually not. But I'm going through a wattle and daub patch right now. Writing-wise, I'm lucky to have my little lean-to. When I write, I write loft. Looks small from the outside, but there's a lot more space inside than you think.

Bernita said...

Lofts have all sorts of interesting angles and cubbies and dormers...

Bonnie Calhoun said...

I'm in renovations right now....adding a hot tub, greenhouse garden room with an indoor pond, extending the master bedroom into a suite and putting in a commercial kitchen....LOL

Bernita said...

~blenches~

But when she's through, Bonnie has a prime piece of real estate.

James Goodman said...

Mine will be built with bone and morter. Did you know bone has a higher tensil strength than steel?

Bernita said...

GOOD description, James!

No, I didn't know that, but it does explain how I crawled out of a car accident with just cracked ribs.

Gabriele C. said...

A Roman villa, very elegant and with clear lines. But the mosaics and frescoes inside, on a second look, dipslay rather grisly scenes, and there's blood on the marble flagstones.

Bernita said...

And includes some extensive and sybaritic baths as well, if I recall correctly, Gabriele.

For The Trees said...

Me, I'm pissed. Fair Thee Well Pissed. I can't get my Master Bath to fit in between the Dining Room and the Master Bedroom, because there's a damn Hallway that MUST go in there, or else I'll have to punch a door through the sheetrock in the Master Closet. And that wouldn't be good.

However, on the other side of the house, the hot tub is in and works quite well, thank you. I go over there quite often and soak my head, my body doesn't need it. I look kinda stupid with my ass in the air, but hey! It's MY house!

Of course, when the wife decides she's had enough of me screaming in frustration over the Master Bath problems (damn double sinks just won't go in the three-foot wide space that's left after the toilet and bidet and linen closet and towel warmers and the all-glass walk-in shower and the spa tub in the corner and the Must-Have All Glass Wall looking out over the Garden (which is now a pile of rubble left over by the stonemasons), then she'll divorce me and we'll have to sell this sumbitch and there'll be all the nasty comments by the agents and then by the purported purchasers (who are really Looky-Loos) and the Building Inspector coming through demanding I finish the Master Bath before selling the house.

Oh, God, I think I'll just set fire to the whole thing now...did I mention I'm having some minor difficulties with my story? Nah, nothing big. I'll get over it.

kmfrontain said...

A house? Darn. I set them up to break them down. My house keeps changing.

Bernita said...

~laughing~
Oh, Forrest, that is so great.
Yes, it's the building inspector that worries me too.

What do you mean, KM? You have a whole sub-division of great houses.

kmfrontain said...

Yeaaah, I guess I'm trying to say that I don't know what house type fits in my subdivision.

Thinking...

Not gothic, not castles, not churches, but I've had some of all. Log cabin, check. Townhouse, check. Tent. Lots of tents. Check, check, check. Living on board ship, check. Manor house, chuheck.

I can't make up my mind, I guess. Even within one piece of work, one house type doesn't always fit. I just can't put a certain house to my writing and say, I'm a bungalow builder, or something.

Did you know that the people in Quebec suffer a seasonal migration fit around the month of May? And almost half the population, that doesn't own a home, ups and changes apartments? Maybe I'm like that.

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